Thoughts: Test automation strategy

I am a bit behind the curve on this I am sure but the free platform Test Automation University by Angie Jones is pretty great. There even is a more high level short course on test automation strategy. I was super grateful for this, because of a few reasons which I will cover in a moment.

Why was I looking at the platform in the first place? Well we have objectives around test automation. (A discussion on objective setting and personal development plans could actually be a whole series. I still very much refer back to Stephen Janaway and what he wrote a while back on the subject and 1:1s. Read the whole series, it is great!)

Don’t assign objectives or tasks if the person doesn’t have time or isn’t motivated

But back to the objectives. Now it is pointless assigning someone an objective or personal development task when they are not motivated to act on it. If someone does not want to learn to code or cannot put in the time for whatever reason, then there is no point in them needing to achieve actually writing some code. At the end of the day we want our teams to succeed and feel like they are growing in their role. Now for some that is simply being a valued team member on their team. But we do like pushing people and letting them explore their role from different angles.

As a company approach we want to aim for continuous delivery where feasible (regulations), which means more automation. But not many of us can or want to learn to code.

So we decided to split our automation focus and take on the approach of not just doing but also understanding the whole approach. This is something I really liked about the automation in testing approach by Richard and Mark. It gives test automation another dimension because it no longer is about automating away testing tasks such as regression but also understand why you are doing it and what other things it enables you to do and how it supports testing activities.

Test automation is a whole team approach

Sometimes though these sort of words need to be in a course or some sort of material for people to accept it and listen to it. So finding Angie’s course on test automation strategy makes the whole subject of test automation way more approachable. Most of us testers lead scrum ceremonies or meetings. We have to be good communicators, so armed with some great questions from that course, anyone can help lead a discussion on a test automation approach to make sure it becomes a whole team approach.

Not being a coder can be such an advantage when designing a test automation strategy

Not being a coder can be such an advantage when designing a test automation strategy, not a disadvantage. I have seen people feel intimidated and scared but all the technical details, but being a functional tester often means you have a whole picture of the application and can really help the team automate the more risky parts of the application and the most valuable to the business.

I found that functional testers can easily feel less valued than the ones who can write automated tests and by also focusing on understanding test automation it made this objective a lot more approachable in my mind, and shows that you can still sit at the automation testing table, even if you cannot code the test. It might even free your mind. You don’t have a predetermined level of “automating that is hard so I won’t even go there” mind block. You are free to ask all the questions around what is possible and then is it feasible given the estimated effort.

So high level what do you need for a test automation strategy? Well watch Angie’s course. 😀

My summary of the first video with some of my own thoughts below.

WHAT?

A goal! What is your goal? This made so much sense to me. This can help you identify where are automation efforts are most value-able.

The most common goal I have seen is to reduce regression testing time. But here it can be important to then not jump to conclusions. Just because regression testing happens by manually clicking through the UI, it does not mean your tests need to do the right thing. Be clever about which layer is gets the automated tests and what your regression tests actually check and think about the least costly design that is most effective and build on that.
WHO?

2 thoughts on “Thoughts: Test automation strategy

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